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  • Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymph nodes and lymphatic system. This cancer may be localized to one particular region, or may spread throughout the entire body. Lymphoma is a relatively common cancer, accounting for 15-20% of new cancer diagnoses in dogs. The prognosis for lymphoma varies, depending on various characteristics that can only be determined by specialized testing.

  • Mastitis is a term used to describe inflammation of a mammary gland. In most cases, mastitis is caused by a bacterial infection. Trauma to the mammary gland, or prolonged periods of milk accumulation without milk removal, can lead to inflammation within the mammary gland.

  • Milk thistle is an herbal remedy that has been used for around 2000 years in the treatment of various health concerns. The Latin name for milk thistle is Silybum marianum. The active ingredient of milk thistle is a flavinoid called silymarin that is found in the seeds. Most herbal preparations contain extracts that are derived from crushed seeds and are standardized to contain a specific concentration of silymarin.

  • The two common guinea pig fur mites are Trixacarus caviae (sarcoptic mange mite) and Chirodiscoides caviae. Chirodiscoides caviae mites may cause mild to no clinical signs at all. Trixacarus caviae mites can cause extreme clinical signs because they cause extreme itchiness. Affected skin will get thick, yellowish, and crusty, with hair loss and secondary bacterial skin infection. These mites cause such itchiness that your guinea pig may even go into seizures and die. Your veterinarian will treat the affected animal with topical or injectable anti-parasitic medications, and since mites live in the environment, the environment must be treated, as well. Trixacarus caviae mites are contagious to people.

  • Mothballs are solid pesticides that slowly release a vapor to kill and repel moths, their larvae, and other insects from stored clothing and fabric. Mothballs are sometimes also used to repel snakes, mice, and other animals, although this use is not recommended and can be harmful to pets, children, and the environment.

  • Pain research has advanced suggesting that a more appropriate choice for managing the chronic pain of OA is multi-modal therapy. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are just one of the options leveraged for multi-modal OA management. These include joint supplements, nutraceuticals, nutrition, adjunctive medicines, physical medicine, and changes to the home environment. Every multi-modal treatment plan is tailored to meet the needs of the individual patient and then adjusted as treatment progresses. Once a full multi-modal pain management plan is in place, your veterinarian may be able to lower the dose of NSAID to minimize the risk of an adverse event, and to reserve a full therapeutic dose for any acute inflammatory pain event.

  • Many herding breeds (most commonly Collies and Australian Shepherds) have a mutation at the MDR1 gene that makes them more sensitive to the negative effects of certain medications. These drugs include several antiparasitic agents (when given at high doses), the antidiarrheal agent loperamide (Imodium®), and several anticancer drugs. The effects of the mutation vary in severity, depending on whether the dog carries one or two copies of the mutation. There is a cheek swab or a commercially-available test that assesses blood samples for the presence of the MDR1 mutation.

  • Most cats instinctively hide their pain as a survival mechanism which can make detecting pain in cats a challenge. Although the signs may be subtle, careful observation of a cat’s everyday behaviors will often reveal pain when it is present. These signs may include changes in behavior, mobility, elimination, and grooming habits. Common pain medications include NSAIDs and opioids. Your veterinarian will choose the appropriate drugs based on your cat's specific needs.

  • Many dogs will instinctively hide their pain as a survival mechanism which in the past, led well-meaning experts to presume that dogs did not feel pain the same way humans do. Although the signs may be subtle, careful observation of a dog’s everyday behaviors will often reveal pain when it is present. These signs may include changes in behavior, mobility, and appetite. Common pain medications include NSAIDs, opioids, and other therapeutics. Your veterinarian will choose the appropriate drugs based on your dog’s specific needs.

  • Penetrating wounds such as sticks, arrows, or gunshots can be life-threatening though the outer appearance of a wound may not seem as severe. Take immediate steps to calm your pet, stabilize any foreign body that is present, and get your pet to your veterinarian. Surgery may be necessary after your pet is stabilized.



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